It’s time to start thinking about how to get the western edge of the Triangle more involved in the growing community of open government events taking place this year. As a past attendee of several of these events, I wanted to make sure these upcoming events are on your radar, and ask you to get involved in the growing collaboration between civically minded citizens and the fast-growing local tech sector.

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This year’s municipal election is over. There were wins I was proud of and losses that deeply disappointed me. Regardless of who you supported in this year’s elections, I think we can all agree that everyone who ran should be given our thanks for stepping up to the plate; that the incumbents who lost should be given our gratitude for their years of service; and that the council and mayoral newcomers should now be given our help, advice, and honest feedback to keep Chapel Hill moving forward on progressive issues.

The choices this fall for local progressives are crystal clear.

In North Carolina, if there are more than two candidates in a primary, the winning candidate must carry at least 40% of the vote in a primary election to win outright. Otherwise, the second-place finisher has the right to request a second runoff primary in which the top two vote-getters from the first primary face off against one another. Second primaries may occur for well-known offices, like Senate or Governor, as well as much lesser-known offices like the various Council of State positions, or may occur for a local race which does not have a statewide component.

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